Monday, April 10, 2017

Topic Discussion: Capillary Leak Syndrome

A recent review in KI summarizes the pathophysiology of capillary leak syndrome and numerous etiologies that can cause it along with an interesting management strategy.

Besides sepsis, capillary leak syndrome(CLS) can be seen in:

1.       Drug induced CLS—classically interleukin 2, gemcitabine and certain monoclonal antibodies such as OKT3, anti CD-28 antibody TGN1412  ( steroids can help treat)
2.       Engraftment syndrome- seen post HSCT ( usually 4-7 days post) with increased inflammatory markers and AKI( 12-25% in most HSCT patients)( steroids can help treat)
3.       Differentiation syndrome( retinoic acid) – steroids help in this situation as well
4.       Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome(OHSS)—two variants( early time course, vs late following HCG treatment)—supportive care
5.       Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis
6.       Hemorrhagic fever( viruses such as Ebola, Marburg, Puumala)
7.       Clarkson’s disease( idiopathic CLS)—supportive therapy, IVIG, theophylline
8.       Others:- snake bites, Ricin overdose, APLAS, Kawasaki disease

In addition to hypotension, cytokines are likely to be important in the pathophysiology of acute kidney injury in capillary leak syndrome. Fluid management is a critical part of the treatment of capillary leak syndrome; hypovolemia and hypotension can cause organ injury, whereas capillary leakage of administered fluid can worsen organ edema leading to progressive organ injury.
The first phase of treatment is volume resuscitation including fluids, pressors and or IV albumin. The second phase includes loop diuretics, diuretics with albumin and finally renal replacement therapy.

Full article here

Sunday, April 9, 2017

Case 90: Answers and Summary

Which of the following is a risk factor for bleeding post kidney biopsy?


This is a tough question. Traditionally, many have thought that ASA is a known risk factor for bleeding post kidney biopsy. A recent large study states otherwise. In a large observational study published in CKJ, >2000 patients were reviewed. The incidence of major bleeding was 2.2%.  The risk factors as assessed by statistics were need for emergent biopsy as oppose to elective renal biopsy. No major risk was noted with ASA use and BMI.  There is data from prior studies suggesting no major risk with amyloidosis unless there is a factor XII deficiency associated with the amyloidosis. Emergent need for a kidney biopsy seems to be the major risk factor more than the others. 


Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Consult Rounds: Pathology of Pre-eclampsia

Image source: JASN 2007

What do you find in the kidney biopsy of a patient with pre-eclampsia?
The immunofluorescence findings are somewhat variable with fibrin deposition often being a prominent feature.



The renal biopsy findings of preeclampsia closest to look in the context of the pathologic patterns seen in thrombotic microangiopathies (TMA). The lesions of preeclampsia share some similarities with and also some differences from those of non-preeclamptic TMA, likely owing to their differing pathogenesis.

What is the LM finding?

The glomeruli are enlarged and solidified (“bloodless”), as a result of narrowed or occluded capillary lumens that are the result of swelling of the native endothelial cells and, to a lesser extent, mesangial cells. The endothelial changes are limited to the glomerular capillaries; arterioles are typically unaffected. Thrombosis by light microscopy is decidedly unusual. In marked contrast, in nonpreeclamptic TMA, thrombosis of vessels and/or glomeruli is a central finding. Cases of severe preeclampsia with accompanying vascular thrombosis often have clinical signs suggesting a superimposed nonpreeclamptic TMA. In severe cases of preeclampsia, in particular as the lesions evolve/resolve, mesangial interposition can be seen, a finding shared with other entities resulting from chronic endothelial insult, such as “chronic” TMA or transplant glomerulopathy. So essentially, it may appear on LM in some cases- as an MPGN pattern of injury ( without the IF being positive for complements or immunoglobuins). This form of injury is termed “Glomerular endotheliosis” 

What is the EM finding?

Ultrastructural analysis will show endothelial cells with loss of fenestrations with cytoplasmic swelling, owing to fluid and lipid accumulation and capillary occlusion.

What is the IF finding?


How is it different from your “classic” non preeclamptic TMA that you might see with SLE or APLAS or in TTP?

The main finding in the “classic” TMA is thrombosis of vessels and glomeruli as the main finding with some endotheliosis. This is a rare finding in pre-eclampsia related TMA unless it is very severe.


Here is a link to a nice review:

Saturday, March 11, 2017

#Visual Abstracts: History and Future in Medicine and Nephrology

Visual abstracts have flooded the social media world in the last few months. Where did this come from and how does it impact nephrology sharing of knowledge?

Looking back I found that these existed for many years in Chemistry journals –also called graphical abstracts.  Visual or graphical abstracts are visual elements that are clearly and in short figure formed conveying the main message of the research( or review) paper.  They are self explanatory and together with the title of the paper convey the main message of the article. Given the current attention spans of readers being short and many learners being “visual”, this method can be quite effective. Journals in medicine are trying to play with this concept for their specific fields.

Dr. Andrew Ibrahim(https://www.surgeryredesign.com/) , creative director of Annals of Surgery began this revolution in Medicine. As per a twitter chat, he mentioned “ We pitched this idea to the editors of Annals of Surgery and they loved it. It was clear in June 2016 that it disseminated faster. This led to a case control cross over of 44 articles between July and Dec 2016 and results are preliminary results are promising.  The articles got read three times more if they had a visual abstract!! Once in Dec 2016, I shared my primer, there are around 20 other journals doing this.”






In the world of Nephrology, Joel Topf took on this venture for Nephjc.com and visual abstracts appeared for the first time in renal world at recent journals club in Fall of 2016.






Following that, the #nephmadness 2017 has featured many visual abstracts, some pasted below




To top it all, CJASN is the first renal journal to enter in the visual abstract world. Great start and totally amazing to have a renal journal embrace this!


Here is an image showing early leaders of visual abstracts ( courtesy Andrew)



Few that I have done




How to create them? Check  out this primer by Andrew
You can create both static and animated abstracts- both can be very important in relaying your message.  I would urge all educators to try this out.

This could make fellowship journal club more fascinating. Make your residents/fellows create them. All researchers should simplify their ideas using such techniques.  All medicine journals should strongly consider this modality.

A new wave of presenting research has arrived- #visual abstracts!

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Concept Map: HSCT related renal disease: big picture


Here is a big picture overview of AKI and CKD seen with bone marrow transplant patients
Click on image for bigger picture.

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